Are You Prepared to “Age-in-Place” ?

91% of seniors surveyed stated a preference to remainvine covered cottage in their own homes as they age in a study conducted by The Global Social Enterprise Initiative of the Georgetown University McDonough School of Business in conjunction with Phillips Healthcare[1]. This is a natural tendency because of the emotional attachment to our vine covered cottage/home where we’ve lived for up to 30 years and raised our families. In addition the equity in our personal residence is often a major part of our financial security.

On the other hand, 59% said that they were NOT interested in upgrading their home to assist with positive aging! 33% indicated that it would be “too costly” to retrofit their house or apartment to allow necessary mobility and provide the other support necessary to remain safely in their existing housing situation. Less than 10% of the respondents plan to “pay whatever it takes to stay in their own homes as they age.”

Smart Technology

The past decade has seen the development of significant technological advances in the A Smart Homeso-called “smart home” that could be beneficial in enabling an aging adult to stay in their home for a longer period of time before considering a move into a structured senior living community. Various technology devices (e.g. automatic stove-top shutoffs) provide additional security and peace-of-mind for the senior and/or their adult children. Yet, only about half of the surveyed individuals plan to adopt this smart technology in their homes. Of those declining to consider the use of this technology, 23% said that they “don’t even know where to start” with 42% stating that it is “too expensive.” The remaining 25% just said they weren’t interested.

MySeniorPortal.com periodically identifies smart technologies and other home improvements to enable adults to age successfully and connects subscribers with the providers that offer these services.

For example:

We know that 1 in 3 individuals over 65 will suffer a fall each year. These falls may necessitate a hospital stay and a rehabilitation or long term care stay during recovery from strains or broken bones. Unfortunately, a fall is often the precursor of a general decline in a senior’s health, forcing them to consider living options other than their own “home”.

We also know that older people tend to have more difficulty in sleeping and frequently get up at some time during the night to visit the bathroom. This is a prime time for a debilitating fall.

One example of smart home technology that could minimize these risks is a passive monitoring device that detects when the senior gets up out of their bed. That device then alerts a series of knee-height mounted LED lights that turn on to illuminate the path to the toilet. The senior (even one with a tendency to get “confused”) doesn’t have to turn on a series of lights (and get “blinded” by the bright light in the middle of the night), the light is directed to the floor, which minimizes the risk of tripping, and the light pattern guides them to the toilet – thus reducing the incidence of incontinence!

Smart technology and other home improvements and modifications can facilitate your ability to age-in-place in your current home.

HAVE A SAFE DAY!

NOTE: this article was first posted in My Senior Portal’s electronic Weekly Digest on January 24, 2015

[1] http://socialenterprise.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/Philips-Infographic11.pdf

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Continuing Challenges or OPPORTUNITY …

for the Senior Living Industry?

Will operators continue to “cut costs” – even when it entails reducing services for the residents?

Will the focus continue to be on “need-driven” admissions and move-ins?

Will the average age of residents continue to increase while the average length of stay decreases?

Will new development and innovations continue to stagnate?

Will the “Aging in Place” movement continue to gain strength with seniors choosing to buy more services that help them stay in their personal residences?

OR

Is this the year that:

a)       The industry begins to prepare for the changing demands and needs of new generations of potential residents? [READ MORE]

b) Progressive visionaries challenge the “status quo” in design and operational philosophies?  [Update to Follow]

c) More emphasis is placed on providing a quality lifestyle for the resident, regardless of his/her medical (physical & mental) limitations/capabilities?  [Update to Follow]

d) Operators embrace new technologies to provide a stronger value proposition as a viable alternative to the prospect remaining in their own home? [Update to Follow]

e) New entrants from outside the industry and foreign investors assume leadership roles with new energy and vision?  [Update to Follow]

Building the NEW Aging Continuum

The following presentation was presented during the “Aging and Technology Industry Webinar”  hosted by GrandCare Systems and sponsored by Dakim Brain Fitness on September 9, 2010.  The PowerPoint presentation may be viewed by clicking here: Building the New Aging Continuum[i].

Participants in the WEBINAR stated that it was “fantastic, always learning”, “so true”, “Great presentation”,  “I love this image”, “This is resident centered care writ [sic] large”, and “Terrific presentation!!!”.  One commented, “I have been waiting for existing senior living communities to actively reach out to the greater community”, while another said, “This all helps take away the dark scary thoughts of ‘retirement living’.”

In addition, the host stated that the presentation “put into words the value of aging technologies to care providers and the NEW continuum of care. Many  in the aging & technology industry have been struggling to express this, especially to our aging service colleagues.”

THE COMPLETE SCRIPT FOR THIS WEBINAR may be accessed below. (more…)

AGING-in-PLACE – Threat or Marketing Opportunity?

A SWOT analysis, identifying Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities & Threats, is often used in developing the marketing strategy for an individual community.  As discussed in several prior articles in the “Wake-up Call” series, the aging-in-place concept should definitely be viewed as a threat to the traditional senior living community industry.

This phenomenon is clearly gaining traction and as reported in the Orlando Sentinel, “it even has its own National Aging in Place Week, which falls on Oct. 11-16 this year.”[i] All indications are that this stated preference will become even more prevalent as succeeding generations age into the historical target demographic for senior living communities.

On the other hand, management, marketing and sales can turn this challenge into an OPPORTUNITY.  It is becoming clearer that an aging adult will need to adapt their living space to be able to continue to effectively “age-in-place”.  For instance, the Orlando Sentinel article identifies the following AGING-IN-PLACE Architectural Features:

Wider doors, hallways and toilets

Same-level transitions or ramps instead of steps

Roll-in showers with wide, doorless entries, grab bars, nonskid tiles, built-in seats and handheld shower units

Walk-in closets, casement windows, lever-style door handles

Waist-high kitchen appliances and storage drawers.

How many of these features are provided as “standard” in your community?

Are some of these features included in selected apartments (e.g. ADA[ii] or “handicapped” units)?

How often do you focus on these features when conducting a tour?

Is your company willing to add certain of these features to accommodate the needs of a potential resident and get a move-in?

Can you speak intelligently about what it would cost the individual to make these changes in their own home?

Some organizations, especially independent living communities, have been reluctant to include several of these safety features for both cost and ambience reasons.  The philosophy of these companies has been to “wait for the customer to ask for it”.  For instance, one IL only included grab bars in their ADA units because they didn’t want the building to look “too much like an assisted living facility or nursing home”.  After losing several prospective residents, the owner agreed to make modifications – AS NEEDED – but encountered problems in retrofitting the showers.

Another industry leader uses lo-rise toilets throughout their buildings, except where ADA regulations require raised toilets.  In most cases, they will “switch-out” the toilet if the resident specifically requests it, but leave it up to local management to handle.

The fact that aging adults are prepared to add these architectural features in their own home should tell builders and owners that it’s time to wake-up. Items such as grab bars, hi-rise toilets and walk-in closets need to become as standard as wide hallways in ALL levels of senior living communities.

Taking this step may initially increase construction costs slightly, but will positively impact marketing. It will enable sales people to build better relationships by focusing on CAPABILITIES vs DISABILITIES!

In fact, safety features such as grab bars, non-skid flooring, etc. may be marketed as part of a HEALTHY AGING concept.  Aging is a normal process and it should become natural to either add these features or move into living accommodations that were designed to promote resident safety.  As senior living specialists, we should promote these features as preventive measures for a healthy aging lifestyle instead of only adding them AFTER the individual needs them.

3 things happen – ALL NEGATIVE – when we make a prospect ASK for features that they may have already installed in their own home:

  • We place them in an awkward / embarrassing situation when they are forced to admit and focus on a frailty.  NO ONE likes to be reminded of their weaknesses – why should we expect a senior to be any different.
  • The value perception is diminished.  The prospect will question:  “WHAT ELSE is LESS than I have at home?” or “WHY don’t they have these features – I thought they were the experts?”
  • They may never ask the question, nor learn that options are available.  They will simply go elsewhere that does provide the desired features.

If your community does offer these features, how do you work it into the conversation and turn them into selling points without making the prospective resident feel “disabled”?

For instance, a 6 – 8 foot hallway is clearly wide enough to navigate a wheelchair, but that’s not what most prospects want to hear.  On the other hand, you might point out how spacious and well-decorated it is and then ask the question as to how it compares with the prospect’s home. [Note:  the average hallway in a single family residence will be 36 inches or narrower.]

The key is to sell a LIFESTYLE vs a litany of real estate features.  This approach will enable you to establish a personal relationship with the prospect and present the retirement community as a positive option, instead of something they will “have to do”.

Show the prospect how different features are designed to keep them safe and able to maintain their independence.  Observe that very few private residences are designed with these safety features even though statistics show that 1 out of every 3 seniors (over 65) will fall each year.[iii] This may prompt a discussion about the type of safety features they have or lack in their home and lead to the conclusion that the “smart” choice is to move-in with you!

A great follow-up question is whether they know what it would cost to retrofit their current home with the same features that you include in their basic rent.  Depending on the extent of the modifications, costs can easily run between $20 – 40,000.  (How many months of service would that buy at your community?)

Invest a little time to establish greater credibility by identifying contractors that are doing those services in your local community and finding out exactly what they charge.

Should the prospect “know” what the costs are, MOVE THEM TO YOUR “HOT LIST”!  They are ready to do something – now all you have to do is convince them that you offer their best alternative!

PLEASE CLICK HERE TO SHARE YOUR OPINION AND/OR READ THE COMMENTS OF OTHERS


[i] “Seniors embrace aging in place”, Jean Patteson, Orlando Sentinel, July 9, 2010.

[ii] Americans with Disabilities Act

[iii] International Council on Active Aging

What Does the Future Hold for the Senior Living Industry?

Dust off the crystal ball, get out the Ouija board and tarot cards, and check with your swami! There are signs that we are coming out of the recession, so will the senior living industry quickly rebound and get back on track?

After all, the “graying of America” is no secret. The Administration on Aging[i] reports that the number of “older Americans” (i.e. over 65) grew by 4.5 million to 38.9M in the 10 years ending in 2008 and are expected to increase to 55 million by 2020.  The 85+ population will increase by 43% to 6.6M from 2000 to 2020 and will just begin to include the “bobby-sox generation (born from 1935 – 1945) with NO baby-boomers in that statistic.  So, won’t that create a “rising tide that floats all boats”?

OR, are there other forces at work that will have a profound and long-lasting impact on the industry? Have these forces been gathering strength behind the scenes while the industry accepted blanket excuses for census declines because of the real estate problems and loss of portfolio values?

Perhaps, now is the time to learn some lessons from the Long Term Care Industry. The 1980’s were “heady” days for that segment of the senior care spectrum. Each year, more facilities and beds were added and the financial markets were happy to fund the growth and consolidation of the industry. They read the statistics at the time and KNEW that the demand would continue unabated “for our lifetime”.  Beverly Enterprises was the clear growth leader after securing the first public equity funding in 10 years in 1980. This and other financings fueled their growth from 100 facilities in 1980 to almost 1200 by the end of the decade.  Hillhaven and others soon followed suit.

So, what happened?  Why did Beverly shrink to less than 300 buildings?  Why has the total number of SNF beds and facilities been decreasing each year (to only 16,000 facilities today)? Why didn’t the demographics continue to drive the growth of the nursing homes?

Obviously, there is no one universal answer to these questions.  Changes in the hospital payment system clearly had an impact on the type of patients being discharged into the SNFs. Meanwhile, the intermediate care (“walking wounded”) residents, and especially the private pay, disappeared from the nursing homes.  WHY?  Because of the rapid development of alternative services for these individuals:  ASSISTED LIVING, INDEPENDENT LIVING and HOME HEALTH.

Americans continue to live longer and the number of older Americans has continued to increase.  The difference is that they no longer have to look only at nursing homes as their source for elder care and support. The introduction of these other alternatives caused a major and permanent shift in the elder care paradigm.

TODAY’S SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITIES FACE THE SAME TYPE OF CHALLENGE AS THE NURSING HOME OPERATORS IN THE 1990’s.

Various studies[ii] have shown that between 85 – 90% of older Americans wish to age-in-place and there are a multitude of new technologies being developed to assist them in achieving that goal. Meanwhile, both independent and assisted living communities are increasingly hearing: “I’m not ready yet!” when communicating with their leads. The question may soon change from WHEN they’re ready to “Will they ever be ready to move-in?”

With the poor economy, it has been very easy to bury our head in the sand and assume that “I’m not ready yet!” is a subtle excuse for the prospect’s inability to afford the services at this time. Although this may be true, it’s also likely that newer generations of prospective residents are less willing to compromise with lifestyle choices than their older siblings and/or parents.

Currently, many assisted living facilities have minimized their census drop by focusing on potential residents with heavy care (and/or memory care) needs. This has been a decent short-term solution to the economic downturn, but parallels the nursing home industry’s gravitation towards heavier, skilled and even sub-acute care.  While they focused on moving those types of patients in the front door, the lighter care residents were going out the back door and into the new assisted living communities 10 years ago.

WE MUST OPEN OUR EYES AND RECOGNIZE THE THREAT OF THE AGING-IN-PLACE PHENOMENA! Otherwise, assisted living will simply become “junior” nursing homes and independent living will struggle to find suitable residents.

As ALFs become more like nursing homes, with heavier and heavier care residents, the probability of increased government oversight and regulatory requirements increases. When that happens, the flexibility to run the buildings with a consumer driven approach will decrease as the cost of care goes up.  Not a pleasant forecast!

Will the government step in and dictate changes to the industry as they’ve repeatedly done for nursing home residents? For instance, while many senior living communities still require all residents to dress for breakfast and be in the dining room at 8am sharp, the new MDS 3.0 being implemented October 1, 2010 for nursing homes requires that residents be allowed preferences for time to awaken, etc.

In a private-pay, “resident-first” environment, these would appear to be “non-issues”.  Yet, one female resident complained: “I worked all my life and had to get up in the morning.  Now, I’m retired and don’t think I should be made to get up and get dressed by 8 o’clock in order to have breakfast!”

We need to learn from the nursing homes’ history where the population that was financially able to pay privately for their services “voted with their feet” as new alternatives evolved. This group told nursing home operators that their physical plants, care options and lifestyles did not meet their demands. Are prospective residents telling senior living communities the same thing today?

To counteract the aging-in-place THREAT, operators need to re-evaluate every aspect of their services to determine ways to add greater value to their prospective residents.  Future residents are likely to want more options and choices, with fewer rules and restrictions. Socialization and lifestyle enhancements (probably more than upgrading the appearance of the building) need to be strong marketing points.  Incorporating some of the “stay-at-home” technology into the senior community may be advisable.

Let Progressive Retirement Lifestyles help you with this evaluation process and turn the aging-in-place challenge into an opportunity. Call Art at 615-414-5217 to discuss the creation of unique outreach programs that provide services to and generate revenues from your prospects who aren’t “ready yet”.

READ COMMENTS


[i] “A Profile of Older Americans: 2009” published by the Department of Health & Human Services’ Administration on Aging.  CLICK HERE for link.

[ii] For example, see Tessa ten Tuscher’s Investor Presentation for Living Well Assisted Living at Home on SlideShare on LinkedIN.

“Do not go gentle into that good night”

– Dylan Thomas

 

In the 1920’s, T.S. Eliot ended “The Hollow Men” with:

This is the way the world ends
  Not with a bang but a whimper.”

This became a philosophy of aging for 20th Century generations.  The senior living / care industry offered protective living environments to meet the expectations of these generations as they aged with increasing physical and/or mental frailties.

BUT the 21st Century is a different world and the bobby-soxers (born 1935 – 1945) and baby-boomers won’t be satisfied to simply fade into the sunsetas their parents and grandparents did.  They won’t “go gentle into that good night” and the senior living industry must evolve to meet the increased demands of these future generations.

Today’s senior living communities were designed to provide care and services for “The Greatest Generation[1]and/or their parents.  These individuals lived through the Great Depression and were molded by the experiences of World War II.  They worked hard and made a better life for their children who often became the first in their family to attend college.  Frequently, they worked for the same companies their entire career and were rewarded with generous retirement packages, including lifetime health benefits.  Others built their own businesses, anticipating that their children would join and then succeed them in operating the company.  In either scenario, the parents were expected to retire with their productivity and significant contributions to society at an end.

The general message from the adult children and even the government has been:

You’ve done enough.  Just sit back and let us take care of you.

Medicare and related programs in the mid-1960’s created the funding for the development of modern health services to “insure” adequate care for these elderly.  Nursing homes and home health evolved from cottage businesses into professionally managed multi-million dollar industries.   Assisted living, independent living and investor owned CCRC’s developed to supplement non-profit (primarily church-related) life care communities and traditional “old folks” homes.

Operators built self-contained communities and assured residents that all their needs could be handled within these enclaves.  Food and shelter, security and transportation for essentials such as doctor appointments[2] were provided.  Activity programs were scheduled to entertain and fill the residents’ days.

Today, prospective residents are told that their worries will be over if they agree to move-in and pay an all-inclusive fee.  Concerns about meals, cleaning and maintaining the house and yard, or paying insurance and utilities, etc. are eliminated.  Depending on the type of facility, care needs may be provided directly by facility staff or arranged with private caregivers / home health companies.

This comprehensive approach led one resident in a recent Tennessean article[3]tostate: “They really take good care of me here. . .  They do everything for you.  They would even make my bed if I wanted them to, but I said ‘No, I want to do something.’”

Progressive Dependency

This chart demonstrates the loss of independence and increasing dependence on caregivers as the senior progresses through varying levels of care.

For individuals who experienced the shortages and deprivations of the Depression and World War II, the value equation was fairly simple.     They understood that the move to a senior living community was a compromise as their health and support needs increased.  They were used to adapting so giving up some independence to receive service was an acceptable alternative and they were willing to live with restrictions such as standard meals at set times.

However, these generations are dwindling – e.g. World War II veterans are dying at the rate of 1000 per day. [4] The replacement generations do not appear as willing to accept this one-size-fits-all-mentality.

The industry has seen quarterly declines in average occupancy for more than 2 years with blame placed largely on the economy and specifically the real estate market.  It’s time for a wake-up call if the industry wants to rebound from this census slump.  Another hidden (or ignored) factor is the “changing of the guard” with new demand models and demographics for today’s aging population.

There currently seems to be an over-riding preference for “Aging in Place”.  The Tennessean[5] states: “Despite more alternatives than ever, the overwhelming majority of elder Americans choose to age in place — in their own home, within the communities where they have lived for decades or have family ties.”

At some stage in the aging process, however, staying at home may NOT be the best option. Health and care needs, financial considerations, safety concerns, marital situation, housing condition, proximity of family members and the availability of caregivers and other components of a strong support system are factors that will impact this evaluation.

Yet, many senior specialists[6] note that the elderly will often stay in their own home until a “crisis” arises.  As a result, the senior is often “placed” in a higher level-of-care than required, with an unneeded loss of independence.

This is obviously not the best for the resident.  Could a senior living community do something differently to encourage the individual to move in earlier?

First, recognize that today’s aging population demands more than three meals a day and the “3-B’s activity program” – i.e. bingo, bible and birthdays.  They are not willing to retire their egos when they stop working.  They desire many more active and productive years with the ability to control their own destiny.

Focus on lifestyle vs real estate.  A HOUSE is an “object that can be bought and sold” while a HOME has “meaning and attachment to … personal living space” that can’t be “bought or sold”.[7] It takes more than living in a Taj Mahal to generate enough value to prompt a move-in.

Apply a scientific approach to the structure and organization of daily activities for the residents.  Utilize Maslow’s theory and healthy aging concepts to challenge the residents to continue to age gracefully, achieve new successes and “CREATE PRECIOUS MEMORIES”.  Treat the residents with dignity and respect by developing imaginative programs that stimulate and challenge their mind, body and spirit, going beyond the kindergarten style Summer Camp for Seniors[8] or cruise ship mentality.

Become familiar with the research about the negative impact isolation has on aging and couple this with Maslow’s need for socialization to develop a powerful marketing tool – offering a SOLUTION for potential residents and, especially, their adult children.

Revise marketing strategies to include education about your scientific approach and other 21st Century initiatives.  Use these to differentiate your community from the competition, AND eliminate prior perceptions.

Train staff to PROMOTE INDEPENDENCE by “helping” residents with their activities of daily living, but not “doing it for them!”  A former resident related an incident where she was made to feel “helpless and incapable” because, at an outing, “everyone tried to get food for me as if I couldn’t do things for myself.”[9]

Finally, accept that the new generation is guided by the words of Dylan Thomas:

Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.


[1]Tom Brokaw, 1998.

[2] Maslow refers to these as “basic” needs in his Hierarchy of Needs.  Select “Maslow” in the CATEGORIES drop-down box to access additional articles dealing with differing levels of needs.

[3] “Facilities offer convenience and care” by Jessica Bliss, 12/27/2009.

[4] Associated Press, May 24, 2008

[5] “Elderly forgo assisted living – opt to stay at home” by Jessica Bliss, 12/27/2009

[6] Click on this link to review comments posted in the Senior Care Services Companies group on LinkedIN.

[7] Courtesy of Jason Popko.

[8] By Ellen Brandt, Ph.D., August 1, 2009 on the Ellen Interactive blog.

[9] Essay by Betty Warren, Hickory, NC, 2006

Do Senior Living Communities Need a Wake-up Call?

Although the housing slump may have “bottomed-out”,  occupancy declines, especially for independent living, are more widespread [1]. for-rent-sign-02.jpgWill the industry re-bound with a business-as-usual mentality?  Will new generations of customers be satisfied with today’s level of service?

There is no question that the real estate crisis and decline in portfolio values have impacted occupancy in senior living communities.  AND, it’s easy to buy into the concept of “We just need to hold on, the demographics are still there, and we’ll be OK as soon as the housing market recovers”.  The reality may be very different.

While the country has been in the economic doldrums over the past couple of years, several dynamics have been changing, largely un-noticed by the industry.  First, the demographics are changing – the target market is gradually moving away from the “greatest generation”[2] [World War II vets are dying at the rate of 1000 per day] – and the industry must prepare for the “bobby-sox” generation (as a prelude to the “baby boomers”).

This generation, born between 1935 and 1945, is affluent and benefitted from the medical advances and healthy lifestyle initiatives of the 20th century.  As a result, they will have longer life expectancies with more males in the target population.  They demand value and will be less willing to compromise than their parents and older siblings who were tempered by the depression and WW II.

In the 1990s, assisted living (“AL”) developed as an alternative to nursing homes, and independent living (“IL”) has in large part developed as an alternative to assisted living facilities.  The newest option is “aging-in-place” with various surveys documenting the desires for aging adults to stay in their own home.  In the past, this wasn’t practical for many people, but we are seeing the development of a number of new companies that use various enabling technologies to provide cost-effective alternatives to senior housing. For example:

image002A study several years ago indicated that up to 80% of AL admissions were driven by the need for assistance with medication management.  Yet, there are now numerous automated medication reminder systems for use in the home.

Numerous organizations have developed cognitive fitness systems to provide brain exercises and delay the effects of Alzheimer’s and other senile dementia.

Rosemary Bakker, a gerontologist with Weill Cornell Medical College has established the website This Caring Home to help caregivers and family members design a “smart home”, allowing individuals with early stage dementia to remain in their own home.

In addition to the psychological appeal of these options, the current economic malaise is forcing prospective residents – and their families – to become more value-conscious consumers.  These products and services will take market share from IL and AL communities by offering greater independence at lower costs.

As a result, the standard AL resident in the future may become a medically complex individual with multiple health/psychological conditions.

The impact on the traditional IL model may be even more dramatic.

Is Everything Doom & Gloom?

The answer is that it doesn’t have to be – IF operators heed the wake-up call and are willing to consider new options:

1.   Embrace new technology, instead of resisting it.  Future generations won’t appreciate things such as internet access, a social networking site for the community, etc. as an added value – they will expect it as a minimum level of service.

Technology should be utilized to promote independence (no matter what level the resident demonstrates at move-in).  View this as an investment in extending the higher functioning of the resident for extended periods of time, which should decrease the turnover rate, extend the average length of stay, and increase the occupancy percentage.

Offer the same technology services that are marketed for “at-home” care in a bundled package, so that the senior living community becomes the value-added solution.  Sell the advantage of having someone on-site who can and will MANAGE the technology for the senior, at the same time they are receiving other traditional services such as meals and transportation.

2.  Meet more than the basic needs for the residents. Abraham Maslow developed a Hierarchy of 5 levels of needs, as depicted in this diagram.image001

The senior living industry has traditionally done a good job of meeting the basic physical and security needs of the residents.   However, there is tremendous opportunity to offer and market services that address their higher-level social, ego and self-actualization needs.

In fact, programs meeting those needs could be the differentiators that trigger the move-in decision.  Interestingly, these needs are the most difficult for the senior to achieve while living alone in their home.

Too often society has assumed that seniors forgo these higher-level needs when they “retire”.  Yet Lasell Village, a CCRC located on the campus of Lasell College in Massachusetts was created around the principle that retirees would move into an independent living setting where they would be committed to an annual continuing education curriculum.  This program is clearly helping the “villagers” achieve their “Peak needs”[3]!

Senior living communities must adjust with the times and add these value-added initiatives if they wish to overcome the inertia caused by the economy and plan for the future generations.

What initiatives are you taking to use technology and/or meet your current or prospective residents’ higher level needs?  Please add your comment by clicking on “Leave a comment” below:

Additional Links for New Technology Options:

Good Design Age Well

Center for Technology and Aging

CareData Trak

CogniFit

Dakim, Inc

GrandCare Systems

MyFitBrain

TheCaringStore.com

.


[1] NIC MAP®, 9/1/2009

[2] “The Greatest Generation” by Tom Brokaw (1998)

[3] “Peak – How Great Companies Get Their Mojo from Maslow” by Chip Conley (2007)