Carpe Diem

Carpe Diem 1

a Leadership Lesson from

 “the Man from Ork!”

In the movie “The Dead Poet’s Society”, Robin Williams as Professor John Keating challenges his students to “learn to think for yourselves”.  As a demonstration of “out-of-the-box thinking”, he stands on his desk to remind himself and his students to not merely accept the status quo, but to challenge the ways things are.

dead-poets-society-quotes-14

Does this just apply to the ivory towers of academia, or do these concepts impact our everyday business lives as well?

  • Albert Einstein said that INSANITY is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.
  • The tag line for a former boss’ email read: “If you always do what you always did, you will always get what you always got!”

Interestingly, these two quotes could be used to justify either constancy or change.   Consistency is one of the hallmarks of most organizations. Once a successful formula is established, management traditionally wants every operating unit to replicate that success and creates multiple policies and procedures to ensure consistent behavior and compliance with their business “model”. Everyone – management, staff, and even the financial community – is happy because they know what to expect → if we do it the waywe’ve always done it”, we can expect the same results!

Don’t mess with success!

As Simon Sinek discusses in his book[i], the tradeoff for this unswerving dedication to these business principles is that responsible dissent is discouraged. He suggests[ii] that organizations become obsessed with WHAT they do and HOW they do it. Employees are managed to accomplish specific tasks more than they are inspired to contribute maximum achievements based upon their abilities.

Yet, if we look at a couple of sports analogies, we’ll see that there are several missing elements to these business models:

  • A football team knows that they can’t run only one type of play and expect to have success.
  • A baseball pitcher understands that he can’t just throw one pitch to the exact same spot to every hitter throughout the game.

In both situations, the players must adapt to change, as we do in the business world.   Sooner or later, the defense is going to figure out how to stop the football play. The same is true with the batters in baseball — a key to success is not letting the hitter know what to expect! Sinek says that successful leaders inspire their organization with a culture of WHY[iii] that allows conscientious employees to challenge the status quo by asking WHY things are done a certain way.

That is the first step in seeing processes in a different way and fuels a spirit of entrepreneurship that will allow individuals in the organization to

SEIZE THE DAY!

making meaningful improvements in design, servicesOh Captain - My Captain and marketing approaches to counter evolutionary changes in the business environment, customer demands, etc.

[i] “Start with WHY”, by Simon Sinek, 2009, Part 1

[ii] Ibid, Part 2

[iii] Ibid

 

PEOPLE

Core Group

 

To become a STAR – a Leadership Success – a manager “must surround her/himself with exceptional people”.[i]  Bus - double deckerStanford University Professor Jim Collins[ii] studied 1435 Fortune 500 companies and concluded that getting “the right people on the bus” was key for sustained long-term success. Although the Stanford study focused on larger public companies, the concepts can be applied to organizations at various stages in their evolution.

As a company grows, many levels of organization will be needed with the “5 P’s” (People, Process, Product, Personality & Performance) applied to each segment / department.[iii] This article focuses on emerging growth companies and the formation of a CORE GROUP of key employees who will impact the future direction of the enterprise.

Organizational Evolution 2The greatest risk of failure for any company is the transition from an entrepreneur-centric organization into a professionally managed organization → the emerging growth sector.

Although commonly classified based upon revenue size, the real characterization of an Emerging Growth Company should be measured in its evolution from a strict entrepreneurial culture into an organization that relies on professional managers, systems and structures to guide its progress.[iv]

In the beginning, “Mom & Pop” start-up a business and control everything.   As the initial concept takes hold and revenues grow, many entrepreneurs adopt what Jim Collins has labeled as the “Genius with a Thousand Helpers”[v] management approach based upon their vision and driving force. The people these small business owners put on the bus tend to be:Charge of Light Brigade 2

  • “Just like me” with similar personality traits and strengths;
  • “Good soldiers” who wait for direction from above and then follow orders; and/or
  • Individuals Proficient in differing technical skills to handle specific tasks and responsibilities depending on the nature of the business.

This type of entrepreneurial organization can be successful for a period of time, but eventually the size of the enterprise, complexity of the decision-making process, increased competition and/or changes in the business environment present challenges necessitating changes in the culture and management practices – no matter how brilliant and capable the founder is! Professor Collins states “Great vision without great people is irrelevant.”[vi]

Unfortunately, the “right people” to successfully lead the company and support its growth into the Emerging Growth category are frequently NOT the ones who were recruited in the earlRR Tracks Croppedier stages. The organization still needs a visionary CEO to drive the bus, but generalists with a diversified background, knowledge of the business and a wide range of talents (vs a cadre of technicians) will give the business its best chance of success in capturing new opportunities and adapting to changing customer demands, economic factors, etc. Getting these “right people” on the bus provides meaningful executive-level input and gives greater latitude than relying solely on the entrepreneur’s single track vision and management style.

5 Finger TeamAt this threshold, the enlightened CEO / Founder will assess his/her “key” employees and recruit additional talent to create an Inner Circle of 5 people (limited for effective interpersonal management) who can be trusted implicitly for honest assessments, to speak their minds openly with differing opinions and perspectives and then to unequivocally support the ultimate decisions as they are implemented.

To create a GREAT organization, the CEO will surround his/herself with individuals who demonstrate natural leadership and possess the characteristics discussed below. This will cause others to respect and look-up to them for guidance.

The technical specialists will still provide value to the company, but generally are not geared to contribute effectively in the Core Group. Functions – including but not limited to – the Chief Clinician (Quality Assurance), Chief Accountant (Controller), 3rd Party Reimbursement Specialist, Risk Manager, Chief of Information Services, Legal, Tax Accounting and Human Resources tend to focus on the details instead of the BIG PICTURE. The personalities of individuals who gravitate to these positions and do well with these responsibilities generally have a strong detail orientation and place a high priority on compliance. They make “good soldiers”, following the lead of and helping the strong “genius”, but are less likely to contribute insightful, ground-breaking initiatives to impact the direction of the company.

CREATIVE: The Core Group should be comprised of people who consistently Challenge the status quo by asking “Why?” or “Why Not?” and are Comfortable “thinking outside-the-box”. They find a way to get the job done with a “Yes! Attitude”[vii] and positive Can-do approach[viii] to problem solving.

CULTURE CARRIERS: This group molds theon-going culture for the organization but should also value “where we’ve been”Winning is a Habit and carry elements of that culture forward. It is important to create a Winning Culture and celebrate success. Coach Lombardi[ix] stated: “Winning is not a sometime thing; it’s an all time thing.   You don’t win once in a while, you don’t do things right once in a while, you do them right all the time.” This philosophy is a cornerstone of a GREAT organization.

CUSTOMER CENTRIC: There are many different types of customers Customer Centricwithin an organization. In health care, the ultimate “customer” is the patient, although 3rd Party Payers are another important customer. In Senior Living, that customer is generally called a resident, but the resident’s family should also be considered a customer. It is important that the Core Group understands that this is not just a slogan for sales and marketing, but takes active steps to ensure that everyone in the company embraces the concept.

The same concepts should be applied to internal customers of corporate support departments to avoid the “tail wagging the dog”. At every level, employees should be reminded that their jobs only exist because of their customers and encouraged to maximize customer satisfaction by anticipating their “unrecognized needs”[x] and then delivering more than the customer expects.[xi]

COOPERATIVE: Core Group members should be self-sufficient, but this is not a place for a “lone wolf” or an egomaniac. Small businesses are frequently started by several “partners” and/or investors → often with differing skills and variations of the shared vision. As the venture grows, TEAM PIXone person typically emerges as the dominant leader to drive the business forward as the CEO. It is not uncommon at this stage – transitioning into a mid-size organization – for a “disconnect”[xii] to occur between the original founders. Gaining their collective Cooperation may be a challenge with each having their own group of loyal followers.[xiii] It is OK for the “right people” in the Core Group to be competitive, but they must rally behind and unequivocally support the emerging CEO and his/her vision and objectives. They must respect the opinions and efforts of others and be willing to work in Coordination with them or “GET OFF THE BUS!

Another challenge is related to the saying that “knowledge is power”. The term POWER was not listed as a key to successful leadership in the “5 P’s” presentation[xiv] because it is an anathema to a GREAT organization when employed by individuals. The Core Group must pull together and share information → they must function as a TEAM that the rest of the organization can emulate.

COMMITTED: Individuals shouldn’t be allowed on the Core Group “bus” unless they are committed to “get it right”.   For this group, it’s not a job → it is a calling! In their words and actions, they Communicate that they truly Care about making the organization, its products and services and dedication to the customers the best they can possibly be. They must believe that there is “always room for improvement” and take aggressive steps to foster Continuous process improvement throughout the company.

In earlier stages, staff Commitment might be characterized by personal loyalty to a leader.[xv] However – in “Good to Great” Companies – the Core Group of key personnel, while retaining consistent and unquestionable loyalty to their “boss”, are driven by a Commitment to the organization’s underlying ideals and principles and develop “unwavering faith” that they “can and will prevail in the end, regardless of the difficulties”[xvi]. This higher level of informed and shared Commitment creates a business that is stronger and more resilient than any one individual.

Jim Collins found that the “right people will do the right things and deliver the best results they’re capable of …”[xvii] and naturally build the winning culture and work ethic in the “Good-to-Great” companies. With this level of commitment, Collins also found that “the best people don’t need to be managed. Guided, taught, led – yes. But not tightly managed.”[xviii] This leads to a highly efficient organization and a rewarding experience for the members of the Core Group.

Win – Win!

5 Cs - Core Group

 

 

[i] “5 P’s of Leadership Success”: People, Process, Product, Personality, Performance, published on the Progressive Retirement Lifestyles Blog: http://wp.me/pCemc-hx

[ii] “Good to Great”, Jim Collins, 2001.

[iii] This will be discussed in detail in a subsequent segment of the “5 P’s” series.

[iv] I once worked in a $100 million public company that employed the “Genius with a Thousand Helpers” approach and in many ways was still run as a “Mom & Pop” operation when I arrived. That company would have been dissolved and assets sold off by the lenders if we had not been able to implement the systems and structure to allow a professionally managed operation. As Professor Collins discussed, we had to recruit some new people to get on the bus, get some existing people in the right seats and get the wrong people off the bus in this process.

[v] Collins, op. cit., Chapter 3

[vi] Ibid.

[vii] Jeffrey Gitomer’s “Little Gold Book of Yes! Attitude”, December, 2006.

[viii] Many of these technical specialties are more geared to tell management why they CAN’T do something; spelling out the risks, limiting regulations, etc. that impact a proposed corporate action. The Core Group must MANAGE these risks, but not allow them to exercise a strangle-hold on effective decision-making!

[ix] Coach Vince Lombardi was one of the best & most successful head coaches in the history of the National Football League. He is best known for coaching the Green Bay Packers to three straight and five total Championships in seven years, including the first two Super Bowls.

[x] “PEAK, How Great Companies Get Their Mojo from Maslow”, Chip Conley, 2007

[xi] Ibid.

[xii] Some are less willing to “dedicate their entire life” to the enterprise, become satisfied with the size or earnings level achieved, disagree about local, regional or national growth strategies, taking on new risks with geographical or product line expansion, or desire a quicker and/or more defined “exit strategy”.

[xiii] Blind, personal loyalty to competing leaders with different personalities and agendas is often found in early-stage ventures. This is similar to the loyalty shown to an Omnipotent Leader In the “Genius with a Thousand Helpers” organization.

[xiv] “5 P’s of Leadership Success”, op. cit.

[xv] Collins, op. cit., “Genius with a Thousand Helpers”

[xvi] Collins, op. cit., Chapter 1

[xvii] Collins, op. cit., Chapter 3

[xviii] Ibid.

5 P’s of Leadership Success

Art Carr:

COMING SOON

Recruiting a Core Group of PEOPLE to guide an enterprise from a small to mid-size company. An in-depth analysis of the CHARACTERISTICS of successful Core Group members that takes former Stanford professor Jim Collins’ “Good to Great” to the next level.
In the meantime, here are five other “P” words that contribute to leadership success:
PROFESSIONALISM: This is an intangible that people often use when describing my strengths and has definitely contributed to my past achievements. Certainly, certifications (e.g. CPA status) help, but the real key is in the attitude and controlled approach to business, including the ability to handle adversity.
PROFICIENCY: One of the “5 P’s” is PERFORMANCE and underlying the organization’s ability to achieve its objectives is the proficiency – skill sets – of its employees. A GREAT LEADER finds multiple and innovative ways to recognize and reward those skills and contributions.
PROGRESS: Every organization must either Progress or slip backwards as its competitors move ahead. I strongly encourage “Finding a Reason to Celebrate” since winning is contagious and the best way to insure continued success is by recognizing small achievements and then building on them.
PRIORITIZATION: Successful leaders learn to Prioritize their personal involvement to avoid getting bogged down in the minutiae and recognize that their focus will have a direct bearing on the achievement of corporate objectives. A key to boosting occupancy in a recent assignment was the establishment of a weekly conference call for an organization with significant census challenges that had monthly worker’s compensation calls, but no routine focus and accountability for census growth. In another situation, I learned that the nursing home staff stayed up all night before a visit by the President to make sure that all handof their vinyl floors were “spit-shined” because they knew he was a fanatic about shiny floors. Some might debate the importance of this “standard”, but the fact remains that the staff responds to whatever is emphasized by the leader – be it cost control, sales & marketing or physical plant. I also use the 5-finger concept to remind people that it’s a good idea to limit the objectives we want line managers to focus on every day to no more than five.
PERSPECTIVE: My observations are based on the “real world” and not an ivory-towered classroom. GREAT LEADERS seldom adopt any business model in toto because each industry and organization has their own key factors and nuances. Success comes from relating the information in this and other management and leadership articles to your unique situation (Relational Learning). Use what is applicable to your circumstances and then utilize your business instincts to modify the rest.

GOOD LUCK!

Originally posted on Progressive Retirement Lifestyles:

INTRODUCTION

The “5 P’s of Leadership Success” have been established as the culmination of my personal analysis and management experiences in combination with research of a number of published texts regarding business culture, management styles and corporate success. Although developed in the senior living / healthcare industry, these winning Principles can be applied to most businesses.

Career Reflections:  Over the course of my career, I have made significant contributions to the success of a variety of different organizations in various stages of their development while fulfilling multiple and diverse roles. New start-ups, emerging enterprises, mid-size companies, and complex industry leaders have all benefited from my skills in developing business strategy, fostering growth and leading turnarounds. I’ve achieved major successes with executive level responsibilities in operational leadership, financial management, sales & marketing coordination, and corporate administration & support.  I’ve worked closely with entrepreneurs, professional business managers and Boards of Directors…

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It’s Derby Week!

Art Carr:

California Chrome is 2/3 of the way to a Triple Crown. What are you doing to share this excitement with your current and prospective residents? There are 3 weeks until the final leg at the Belmont and plenty of time to organize a marketing event. READ BELOW!

Originally posted on Progressive Retirement Lifestyles:

Building a Multi-part Themed Marketing Event

Where will you be at 6:24pm (ET) on the first Saturday in May?

Churchill Downs

  • If you’re a “Kentucky Colonel”, you might be in the grandstand at Churchill Downs in Louisville, KY for the Kentucky Derby → sipping a mint julep.
  • Millions of others will be watching the Run for the Roses on their local NBC station on TV.
  • And, the tech-savvy may be live-streaming via the internet on their computers and/or smart phones.

What about the Residents of your Senior Living Community?

  • Does the race fall right in the middle of their normal evening Westminster-5802meal?
  • Do you have any activities planned around Derby Week?
  • Are you missing the chance to provide a venue for your residents to share an activity with their family & friends?

What about your Future Prospective Residents?

  • Are you missing an opportunity to involve them in a social event & interact…

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Published in: on May 19, 2014 at 11:28 am  Leave a Comment  
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And now … The Rest of the Story

And now … The Rest of the Story.

Published in: on March 19, 2014 at 9:34 pm  Leave a Comment  

And now … The Rest of the Story

2014 Women's Final Four

NCAA Women’s Basketball Tournament

TRIVIA Question:  Who is the winningest Division 1 basketball coach of all time?  Clue → it is NOT in a men’s basketball program and it is NOT a man.

Answer:  Pat Summit, Head Coach Emeritus with the University of Tennessee “Lady Vols” basketball team.  “She kept her elite program in the winner’s circle for almost four decades, producing a mind-boggling record of 1,098-208 (.840) that included the most victories in NCAA basketball history. During her tenure, the Lady Vols won eight NCAA titles as well as a combined 32 Southeastern Conference tournament and regular season championships. Tennessee made an unprecedented 31 consecutive appearances in the NCAA Tournament and produced 12 Olympians, 34 WNBA players, 21 WBCA/Kodak/State Farm All-Americans earning 36 honors, and 39 All-SEC players earning 82 recognitions. Along with the success on the court, Summitt’s student-athletes had tremendous productivity in the classroom. Coach Summitt held a 100 percent graduation rate for all Lady Vols who completed their eligibility at Tennessee.”[i]

The Lady Vols along with UConn (Connecticut), South Carolina and Notre Dame are again a number one seed in the 2014 NCAA Division 1 Women’s Basketball Tournament with 1st round games beginning this weekend.  Although Pat won’t be on the sideline for Tennessee (Holly Warlick now coaches the Lady Vols), other familiar coaching icons will be at tLadies Basketball Coach Iconshe tournament including Geno Auriemma from UConn, Tara VanDerveer with the Stanford Cardinal, and Kim Mulkey, coach of the Baylor Lady Bears.  These 4 coaches have produced over 3260 victories,  winning 20 national championships in a combined 115 years of coaching, and each has become an institution at their university.

In total, teams from 30 states will be participating in the women’s tournament with New York having the most teams (6), followed by California and Tennessee with 5 each.  Seven other states (Georgia, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Oklahoma, South Carolina and Virginia) have 2 schools in the tournament.  This should give you plenty of opportunity to generate competition for your residents – especially in those situations where you have both large (i.e. major conference) and smaller schools competing (e.g. Stanford vs Cal State – Northridge;  LSU vs Northwestern LA, or Texas vs Prairie View).

Women's Tournament by State

  • A special mention should be made for the “Black Knights” women’s basketball team of the U.S. Military Academy.  Although located (and counted as a NY school) at West Point, NY, this team is really a “national” team and should receive support from across the country.
  • Kudos to Connecticut and Notre Dame who are each undefeated in regular season and conference tournament play going into the NCAA tournament.
  • There are 5 additional states (Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, South Dakota and West Virginia) that were not included in the Men’s NCAA tournament.  {See “Forget the Activity Calendar. . . ACT NOW!” for suggestions about utilizing the NCAA tournament as the basis for an enriching resident activity program and marketing event}
  • Five schools — Akron, North Dakota, South Dakota, Winthrop and Wright State – are all making their first NCAA tournament appearance
  • 25 of the teams join their male counterparts at the Big Dance.  The Women’s Tournament adds post-season play for 39 additional teams and gives you 5 more states to build resident support around.

    How about a competition between the Men’s and Women’s teams for the 25 colleges with both teams in the SHOW?  Who will go farther in their tournament? 

The NCAA Women’s Basketball Tournament offers some challenges, but many more opportunities for meaningful dialogue and interactive programs with the predominantly female population in today’s senior living communities.   One of the challenges is that the NCAA tournament has only been organized for women since 1982 so it’s unlikely any of your residents ever played in the tournament.

TRIVIA:  Kim Mulkey played on the first championship team from Louisiana Tech in 1982 and is the first person, man or woman, to win a basketball national championship as a player, assistant coach and head coach.[ii]

TRIVIA:  Tennessee and Connecticut have won almost 50% of the National Women’s Championships with 8 titles a piece.

On the other hand, most of the 1st and 2nd round games are played “on campus” with attendance a lot less than at the men’s games.  Therefore, if your community is near one of the 16 tournament sites you might have the chance to actually take a group of residents to see one or more of the games.

Los Angeles, CA Toledo, OH
Seattle, WA West Lafayette, IN
Ames, IA Knoxville, TN
Iowa City, IA Chapel Hill, NC
Waco, TX Durham, NC
College Station, TX College Park, MD
Baton Rouge, LA University Park, PA
Lexington, KY Storrs, CT

The Sweet 16 games will be played in Lincoln, NE; Stanford, CA;  Notre Dame (South Bend), IN and Louisville, KY with the Final Four in Nashville, TN.

One of the biggest opportunities is to create an inter-generational sharing experience for your residents, their adult daughters (bobby-soxers and baby boomers), grand-daughters and great grand-daughters.  The residents and their adult daughters lived through a cultural revolution started by the United States Congress’ passage of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972.  This legislation changed the face of women’s athletics across all levels and 10 years later led to the first NCAA Women’s Basketball Championship Tournament.

  • In 1971, the year before Title IX became law, fewer than 300,000 girls participated in high school sports, about one in 27. In 2002, the number approached 3 million, or approximately one in 2½.[iii]
  • In 1972, fewer than 32,000 women competed in intercollegiate athletics.  Women received only 2 % of schools’ athletics budgets, and athletic scholarships for women were nonexistent.  In 2008-09, a record number of 182,503 women participated in competitive college athletics, accounting for 43% of college athletes nationwide.[iv]

Along with the increased participation, the game of “girls” basketball itself has also seen significant change.  Before Title IX (i.e. when all of the residents as well as the Bobby-soxers and many of the Baby Boomers were growing up), girls basketball was more a part of the Physical Education curriculum than a competitive sport.  Today’s young girls would hardly Ollie-Hoosiersrecognize the half-court game, uniforms of Bermuda shorts and white blouses, and all foul shots thrown under-hand like Ollie in the movie Hoosiers!  Fast breaks, rebounding “above the rim”, even dunks were foreign to the pre-1972 women’s game.   SO, set up an inter-generational discussion group and encourage your residents (and prospects) and their older adult children to share their remembrances of girls basketball in the “days of yore”.  Invite a local college or high school team to participate in the discussion and help them understand the legacy that they have inherited. Humphrey Bogart said, “Louie, I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship in the movie Casablanca and you can build that same type of on-going relationship with a local school team throughout the coming year.

Finally, the Girl Scouts of America developed Girl Scout badgea new patch that members can earn with activities focused on the history, importance and media portrayal of women in sports.  It was developed in conjunction with the 2014 NCAA Final Four in Nashville, TN and offers a tremendous opportunity for your residents to interact with the young scouts.

You have all the ingredients for a dynamite activity program and customized marketing event that demonstrates appropriate respect for the life accomplishments of the residents.  The potential of getting multiple generations from the same family together in your building focused on a common interest – including participation in March Madness games as discussed in a prior article – is priceless.

 


“THAT’S GREAT … but my TEAM isn’t going to the SHOW!”

“THAT’S GREAT … but my TEAM isn’t going to the SHOW!”.

Published in: on March 18, 2014 at 2:47 pm  Leave a Comment  

“THAT’S GREAT … but my TEAM isn’t going to the SHOW!”

Dejected Basketball TeamLess than twenty per cent of the 351 Division I colleges and universities get invited to the NCAA tournament each year.  But that doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t proceed with the March Madness activities and events suggested in “Forget the Activity Calendar. . . ACT NOW!” [http://wp.me/pCemc-j8] if your favorite team wasn’t selected.  This article includes five additional methods to tie into the excitement created by college hoops at this time of year.

 

NIT Logo♥  If you live in West Virginia, you might want to switch your focus to the National Invitation Tournament (“NIT”), which includes 32 additional teams and concludes with the final games played at Madison Square Garden in New York City.  Arkansas, Indiana, Illinois, Minnesota, Mississippi and Vermont join West Virginia as additional states represented in the NIT that were excluded from the original 68 teams in the NCAA Tournament.

 

Cinderella     There are 32 Conferences included in the NCAA Tournament.  Determine what conference that your local school belongs to and then your residents can cheer for (or against → in some cases fans will root for “my school or whoever plays ABC University!”) the Conference Champion who is at the Big Dance.  Frequently these teams from the smaller conference – who only get an automatic bid by winning their conference tournament – become the Cinderella team of the tournament.   Will their trip end after one game or will they go “deep into the tournament”?

Even if this doesn’t apply to your local team, let your residents pick a Cinderella team from one of the non-major conferences and support them in the tournament.

  There are 14 different sites where the tournament games will be played over the next 3 weeks, including Dayton, OH for the four “play-in” games on March 18 & 19.  Even though there are no Indiana schools in the tournament, Indianapolis will be the location of the Midwest Regional Finals on March 28 – 30.  If you are near one of these locations, there should be a lot of local press in newspapers, TV, etc. that you can tie into.  You don’t have to do a full “Bracketology”, but have fun by picking the winners in the local games.  Set up pools for a) largest margin of victory, b) total margin of victory (all games), c) number of overtime games, etc.  Vote for favorite coach and/or player.  If you’re into social media, sponsor that person online.

  If your local team’s season is over, contact the Athletic Department and request a visit from someone on the coaching staff and/or the Cheer Squad.  Explain what you are doing to involve your aging adult residents and ask them to participate in your “life-long-learning” series by presenting a 15 – 20 presentation on how the tournaments work, etc.   Tell them that you know how hard they work and that your residents want to recognize their achievements in this season as you wish them more success in the future.  Build the foundation for an on-going, inter-generational relationship with the school.  Consider the residents’ excitement to have the Cheer Squad do a couple of routines for them in your building and maybe have the mascot speak.

Cheer Squads

Star Difference If you really want to “think outside of the box”, work with the Athletic Department to create several special awards that could be presented in a ceremony at your community (e.g.  Above and Beyond, All-Around Excellence, Rising Star, Leadership/Citizenship, etc.→ contact me directly for more ideas and help in implementation).   This is another great way to generate “free press” and present your community in a very positive fashion.

♥  Finally, there are another 64 teams in the Women’s UT - UConn Ladies BasketballNCAA Basketball Tournament.  Because of the preponderance of females in our resident populations, this may offer a particularly attractive alternative for celebrating March Madness, which will be addressed in a subsequent article.

The important thing is to DO SOMETHING!  Don’t be a slave to your published activity calendar and miss this opportunity to improve the interactive lifestyle of your residents.

NCAA Basketballs

Forget the Activity Calendar . . . ACT NOW!

Art Carr:

Don’t be “locked in” by the Activities Calendar you created last month. There is time to be innovative and do something that helps your residents stay attuned with positive things that are going on in the “outside world”.

Originally posted on Progressive Retirement Lifestyles:

NCAA Basketball One of the most publicized CURRENT EVENTS that involves millions of people in the workplace every year IS HAPPENING NOW →  the NCAA Basketball Tournament.  What are you doing to involve your residents in the excitement that permeates our entire society – aka “ March Madness ”?
  • There are 68 schools in the Tournament.
  • The schools represent 32 stat2014 March Madnesses plus the District of Columbia (Washington, D.C.) {65% of states}.
  • Two-thirds of these States have more than one school in the tournament.
  • One-third have 3 or more schools participating.
  • 4 states:  California, North Carolina, Ohio, and Texas have 4 schools included.

Can you identify a participating school from your state and generate interest and support from your resident population for that school(s)?  For multi-school states, you’ve got a perfect opportunity to create some friendly competition within your community to produce an additional level of excitement.

  • Set up your own March…

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Published in: on March 18, 2014 at 10:40 am  Leave a Comment  
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